April 27, 2015. Updated on 4/27/16 Steve Sabz
Grim reaper on a dark background (Photo by fergregory)

Grim reaper on a dark background (Photo by fergregory)

3,600 Jews slaughtered, Jerusalem's 4 years of peace ends

April 27, 66 A.D.  Jerusalem

Residents of Jerusalem enjoyed a time of "very great peace and prosperity"  from 63 to 66 AD. Unfortunately, their tranquility abruptly ends and the war drums begin to beat when procurator of Judea, Gessius Florus (appointed by Emperor Nero) , attempts to steal seventeen talents of gold from the temple treasury. When he is prevented and afterward mocked by the Jews, he returns with a vengeance and commands his soldiers to plunder the Upper Market-place. He also whips and crucifies 3,600 men, women, and children  on the 16th of Iyyar (April 27th) in 66 AD. Interestingly, a mysterious man named Jesus, the son of Ananus, warned Jerusalem's citizens of its approaching calamity just three years earlier. This massacre triggered the Jewish revolt that led to Jerusalem's desolation and the destruction of the 3rd (Herod's) temple. The Jewish-Roman war ended on August 31, 70 AD with 1.1 million dead and 97 thousand captured out of the approximately 3 million who were imprisoned in Jerusalem  by the Roman army (Luke 21:24).


CITE:
Sabz, S. (2015, April 27). 3,600 Jews slaughtered, Jerusalem's 4 years of peace ends. Retrieved from https://scienceandbibleresearch.com/florus-slaughters-jews.html


Steve Sabz

Steve Sabz

Steve Sabz is the author and founder of Science and Bible Research. He is a professional educator with a Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise Physiology from William Paterson University,  where he also completed graduate level courses in Human Physiology and Endocrinology. Currently, Steve is pursuing a Master of Arts in Systematic Theology at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary.  Steve is also the author of Evolution's Complexity Problem: See How Evolution Falls Apart At Its Beginning and End Time Rewind: An Exploration In Bible Prophecy And The Fate Of The World.